NELSON TRAILS

Jimmy Lee Creek Walkway

Jimmy Lee Creek Walkway is short native bush walk right on the edge of Richmond. The track begins on Hill Street and heads up Jimmy Lee Creek gully, climbing to Grassy Saddle (230 m) halfway up Barnicoat Range, before dropping down into Will’s Gully and returning to Hill Street.

Details
Length 2.8 km one way
Time Required 45 min – 1 hr one way
Trail Type Walking track
Physical Difficulty Moderate   
Uses Walking and trail running
Direction Either
Start Elevation 50 m (Hill Street; either end)
Max Elevation 230 m (Grassy Saddle)
Dog Access Dogs are permitted but must be on leash

Connections

Henry Road (Kingsland Forest)

Walking, trail running and MTB

Dellside Reserve

Walking, trail running and MTB

Access

  5 min from central Richmond

 

Both ends of the loop track begin on Hill Street, Richmond. The northern end begins opposite Bill Wilkes Reserve Walkway, just south of the Hill Street-Queen Street intersection. The southern end is just north of the Hill Street-Hart Road intersection (look for sign reading ‘Dellside Reserve’). There is plenty of parking on Hill Street at both track ends. If you don’t mind adding another couple of kilometres to your walk or run, park at Washbourn Gardens in central Richmond and follow the walkway through Bill Wilkes Reserve to Hill Street.

Description

Starting at the northern end, the track follows the true right of the creek, through the native bush of Jimmy Lee Creek Reserve. Native Bird Recovery Richmond has been undertaking pest control in the reserve for more than a decade, which has seen increasing numbers of many native bird species (you will see the information panel at the track start). There is a bird feeding station and viewing platform close to the track start. After 500 m you will reach a kissing gate, after which an alternative loop can be taken on the right. The alternative route climbs higher up the gully side and is a better option when the creek is running high or when the lower gully is wet and muddy. After this point there are several creek crossings so be prepared for the possibility of wet feet.

 

The track reaches an intersection with Cypress Road (a forestry road that connects to Dellside Reserve) where the alternative loop connects back to the main track. Go up the steps that continue up the gully to a historic dam (which is said to have supplied water to a local farm). Soon after you will reach some mossy wooden markers that signal a left-hand turnoff to a rough scout track that continues up the gully to the top of the range.

 

Jimmy Lee Creek Loop reaches the edge of a forestry block and climbs to Grassy Saddle (230 m). There is a picnic table at the saddle, and Henry Road continues uphill (very steeply) through Kingsland Forest to Heatons Road and Richmond Fire Lookout.

 

From Grassy Saddle the track zig-zags down into Will’s Gully through native tree plantings, and then goes down Fossil Steps and crosses Hart Creek. The track climbs up the side of the gully above the creek and heads straight down to Hill Street.

Jimmy Lee Creek Walkway

The Centre of New Zealand is located atop Botanical Hill (147 m), on the eastern edge of Nelson city centre. A network of tracks covers the hill and gives access to Sir Stanley Whitehead Park, and Branford Park in the Maitai Valley. The summit offers fantastic views over Nelson City and Tasman Bay.

Trail Details
Length 2.8 km one way
Time Required 45 min – 1 hr one way
Trail Type Walking track
Physical Difficulty Moderate   
Uses Walking and trail running
Direction Either
Start Elevation (Hill Street; either end)
Max Elevation 230 m (Grassy Saddle)
Dog Access Dogs are permitted but must be on leash
Access

  5 min from central Richmond

 

Both ends of the loop track begin on Hill Street, Richmond. The northern end begins opposite Bill Wilkes Reserve Walkway, just south of the Hill Street-Queen Street intersection. The southern end is just north of the Hill Street-Hart Road intersection (look for sign reading ‘Dellside Reserve’). There is plenty of parking on Hill Street at both track ends. If you don’t mind adding another couple of kilometres to your walk or run, park at Washbourn Gardens in central Richmond and follow the walkway through Bill Wilkes Reserve to Hill Street.

Description

Starting at the northern end, the track follows the true right of the creek, through the native bush of Jimmy Lee Creek Reserve. Native Bird Recovery Richmond has been undertaking pest control in the reserve for more than a decade, which has seen increasing numbers of many native bird species (you will see the information panel at the track start). There is a bird feeding station and viewing platform close to the track start. After 500 m you will reach a kissing gate, after which an alternative loop can be taken on the right. The alternative route climbs higher up the gully side and is a better option when the creek is running high or when the lower gully is wet and muddy. After this point there are several creek crossings so be prepared for the possibility of wet feet.

 

The track reaches an intersection with Cypress Road (a forestry road that connects to Dellside Reserve) where the alternative loop connects back to the main track. Go up the steps that continue up the gully to a historic dam (which is said to have supplied water to a local farm). Soon after you will reach some mossy wooden markers that signal a left-hand turnoff to a rough scout track that continues up the gully to the top of the range.

 

Jimmy Lee Creek Loop reaches the edge of a forestry block and climbs to Grassy Saddle (230 m). There is a picnic table at the saddle, and Henry Road continues uphill (very steeply) through Kingsland Forest to Heatons Road and Richmond Fire Lookout.

 

From Grassy Saddle the track zig-zags down into Will’s Gully through native tree plantings, and then goes down Fossil Steps and crosses Hart Creek. The track climbs up the side of the gully above the creek and heads straight down to Hill Street.

Connections

Henry Road (Kingsland Forest)

Walking, trail running and MTB

Dellside Reserve

Walking, trail running and MTB

Updated 18 February 2019